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Centerpoint Gallery is a multi-use alternative gallery space.
For gallery viewing availability, please contact Phoebe Alexander at 212-744-0257, 917-443-7358 (cell).
View exhibition guidelines and terms here (Word document).
Our arts programs have been made possible in part through the assistance of the
WILLIAM GARDNER FUND FOR THE ARTS at Anthroposophy NYC.

Khalid Kodi - Narratives of Body and Shapes


Khalid Kodi, long recognized as a prolific Sudanese American master artist, educator, and cultural critic, has emerged as a central figure, exploring multi-cultural concepts and transcending cultural boundaries. He uses contemporary themes and methods along two lines of work, namely conceptual political work and aesthetic installations.

Born in Sudan, Kodi migrated to the United States in the early 1990s. As an African living in America, he has embraced both American and African cultures, engaging both in constant dialogue. He has used his art as a forum to teach and to bring issues of the civil war in Sudan to his Sudanese community all over the world as well as to citizens of other nations.
Kodi is an adjunct professor of fine arts at Boston College and the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. In addition, he is a resident artist in the African-American Master Artists in Residence Program (AAMARP), a program in the Department of African-American Studies at Northeastern University. Kodi was a 2013 summer faculty member and artist-in-residence at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. He also taught at Brown University.

Conceptual and Aesthetic Work
Through his conceptual work, Kodi creates art carrying messages of social justice, involving community engagement as a means of pedagogy and social change. Kodi’s past series have included works on human phenomena such as wars, genocide and their impact on human societies. These works incorporate sculpture, paintings, installations, and environmental sites and have been featured in many national and international venues.
Through his work, Kodi advocates for and humanizes victims and survivors of war and genocide in Africa. His art has brought awareness of the ugly truth of war and genocide to the larger international community. His exhibitions carry outreach and educational messages that promote peace and human dignity, celebrating his rich African heritage.
In addition to his powerful conceptual and political work, Kodi has produced paintings and installations focused on inner aesthetics. In this vein of work, he explores traditional story telling with references to magical realism, intricately layered in textures, symbols and figures through the synthesis of colors and rhythms.

Public Presence and Acclaim
Since the early 1990s, Professor Kodi has been actively creating innovative projects and programs that aim to advance sustainable peace between communities with diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds and histories. This work has involved participatory approaches to help communities rebuild and overcome individual and collective trauma resulting from war. His ongoing research is on the role of culture – arts, architecture and urban planning and design— in transforming, rehabilitating, overcoming, and building communities. He has targeted youth, child soldiers, and women as agents of transformation.
Khalid Kodi’s work has been widely exhibited with critical acclaim, featured in numerous academic and popular publications including the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and Nka! The Journal for African Arts, among others.
Kodi has led numerous projects such as Violence Transformed. In 2011, he founded the Artist Movement to Engage Nonviolence (AMEN) at Boston College. He has also served on the board of several organizations that focus on Sudan, including the Sudan Studies Association. He is a board member of the Darfur Rehabilitation Project, based in New Jersey. Furthermore, Kodi has received several grants, fellowships and residencies related to his work in enacting social change through art.

Featured Works
Khalid Kodi’s Blue Tales, inspired by the artist’s childhood in Sudan, blends and layers a personal history of dreams, memories, and experiences. With magical realism, the mixed media and collage of Blue Tales give the viewer a profound, nuanced insight into the vibrant story of the artist as a child in Africa.
Through Negotiating Boundaries: Visual Marks as Alternative Narratives, Kodi utilizes both small- and large-scale painting, drawings, and mixed media on paper to facilitate transcendence of strict cultural boundaries. Through these contemporary themes, featured in the Centerpoint Gallery in New York City, Kodi pioneers new methods of appropriating the stories of victims, transforming them from powerless into powerful.
With these works, Kodi transmits a deeply intimate yet accessible perspective, both reflective and hopeful. Employing his individual experience to draw in the viewer in Blue Tales and then working to create a vision of progress and social change in Negotiating Boundaries, Kodi perfectly combines personal appeal with practical ideals through his two featured works.

For viewing availability contact Joyce ( joycereilly [at] aol.com) or Phoebe (phoebe [at] artopathy.com or 917-443-7358). For a Private Showing: bfosterinc2 [at] gmail.com.



Doug Safranek - Lynn Loflin


Lynn Loflin is Executive Chef of Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, overseeing meals to two NYC senior Centers, a Head Start Program, and Women’s Shelter at the Park Avenue Armory. She currently owns and operates Newton Farm in the Catskills, which provides organic produce to New York restaurants and has a small Community Supported Agriculture program. Lynn also teaches culinary arts at Columbia Institute for Human Nutrition in the Medical Nutrition Graduate Program for health care professionals. Lynn spends most of her free time sewing and farming. She writes, “I have always been a seamstress and maker of things. Color, language, and the idea of collective memory have been a lifelong obsession. The soothing, meditative repetition of needle and thread handwork and the moment to moment bringing forth of line, color, and text are for me the perfect act of creation.”


Doug Safranek received an MFA from the University of Wisconsin where he studied with Robert Grilley, magic realist John Wilde, and art historian James Watrous who introduced him to egg tempera painting. Safranek currently teaches egg tempera technique at the Art Students League in New York. His work is included in a number of public and private collections, including The Norton Museum of Art, The New York Historical Society, The Museum of the City of New York, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Awards include an Elizabeth Greenshields Grant and a Gold Medal from the Allied Artists of America. He is represented by the ACA Galleries in Chelsea.
For the past thirty years the principal subject of my paintings has been the urban landscape of New York City and the wide variety of folk who populate it. Recently, however, I've begun work on a series of 8" X 6" portraits depicting family members and a number of my New York friends. I've also begun to construct still lifes out of fruits and vegetables grown in my backyard garden or purchased from the farmers' market in McCarren Park which is several blocks from my home in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. It's a collection of these recent portraits and still life paintings that I've chosen for this exhibition.

Color - In and Out of Form
A collaboration between Sarah Parrilli and Laura Summer

In this exhibit (through March 13) we will explore a collaboration on color, using various approaches, media, intentions and inspirations.
Is painting an expression of an artist or a conversation between the artist and the color?
What happens when the motif becomes recognizable?
What about when it is “abstract”?
As a viewer does it matter what lens we use to look at a painting?
Is our thinking-understanding different from our feeling-understanding?
Sara Parrilli began handcrafts and visual arts in Waldorf school, holds a BA from the Fashion Institute of Technology and completed the Free Columbia Art Course in Philmont, NY.
Free Columbia co-founder Laura Summer trained with Jennifer Thomson; her approach to color is influenced by Beppe Assenza, Rudolf Steiner, and by Goethe’s color theory.
For viewing availability contact Phoebe (phoebe@artopathy.com or 917-443-7358).


New Works by David Taulbee Anderson

David trained with Gerard Wagner at the Wagner School of Painting at the Goetheanum. He received a painting teaching certificate from the Goetheanum and currently teaches watercolor with Rudolf Steiner’s training motifs in Manhattan.
This exhibition records a stream of daily work based on original ideas carried out in the quicker and more direct medium of tempera on cardboard. The new paintings would not have arisen without long training and teaching with watercolors that opened up a relationship with the essence and the being of color.


The Growing Imagination:
From the Contents of Spiritual Science

View this exhibit online

An exhibition of paintings by artists following Rudolf Steiner's Training path for painters, a working group led by David Taulbee Anderson. For viewing availability contact Phoebe (phoebe@artopathy.com or 917-443-7358). Visit the group on Facebook: "Rudolf Steiner's Training Path for Painters."